Monday, September 15, 2014

African Youth Renaissance

Present ‪#‎African‬ youths must be alert and open their eyes to the reality on ground. Centuries ago, ‪#‎Portuguese‬‪#‎French‬ and ‪#‎Britons‬ gave our ancestors options on cruelty, using high level weapons of war to conquer, oppress and forcefully march Africans across oceans into slavery. In time, they now began to shift ideology and keyed into tricks of decolonization in pretence of leaving Africa.

From all indications, smart Africans would agree with me that much more than a stint of colonization is still seriously eating up Africa's growth and development. We are made to become spectators when it comes to control of our natural resources. Our leaders have been so maneuvered that they lost all catalyst that would promote internal democratization and good governance. We have been tuned to believe that the best only comes from abroad.
Dear African youths, lets look inward to see how blessed a continent we've got both in human capital and natural endowment, creativity, prowess, tenacity, courage and politeness of the African. We must as a generation rise up to the challenge of nation building, work together and fault the negative actions of our fore-bearers and even the present leaderships.
Answers to African challenges do not necessarily depend on the ‪#‎UN‬; we do not necessarily have to depend of foreign aid; what about the ‪#‎AU‬? what about all the income from our exports; what about the funds that these so called experts have syphon from our treasury? They are bribing us with peanuts and tactically draining Africa.
Let's check for instance, in all African countries where extractive companies are operated by multi-national companies (like ‪#‎ExxonMobil‬,‪#‎Shell‬, etc in Nigeria), has there been any Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) duly adhered to? None, not in any African country. Instead, the host communities are in dire hardship and poverty caused by the effect of the activities of these companies.
No hope in the wings of our current leaders for they've been used and reused. They are just playing a script.
However, Africa has a strength in youth demography. Yes! We must rise as a generation without timidity and challenge the status-quo; ask critical questions; raise alarm on persons who embezzle public funds for personal aggrandizement. Young Africans must set a platform that promotes brotherhood without stigmatization or partiality on power, wealth nor academic achievement.
Without mincing words, global focus has been shifted to Africa. Why? Africa is the most sustainable continent in the present global map. The same so-called colonizers are strategizing modernised colonisation -giving aid via huge loan bonds with stiffen MOUs; at the long run, the loans accumulates; fueling internal crisis all the way, ...*games*. Is there one Africa country that is not borrowing?
Why is it that more than at least 30 years of the so-called independence, Africa can't boast of outstanding institutes of technology, science and development. No research institutes, no dependable healthcare facility. Our young doctors, engineers, architects, social scientists, development workers, can only boast of MBAs and Master degrees obtained abroad. Why, why, why?
I want to provoke the thinking of African youths and potential leaders to think beyond attending ‪#‎Geneva‬ meetings and international conferences; to rethink about the prospects we all hold for our dear continent. Lets re-channel our collective efforts towards ensuring a total revamp of the polity "for if the foundation is faulty, the house is laid waste someday".
We as young African must meet here in Africa, leaving no youth behind and plan step-by-step modalities to twist and squeeze the hand of the thieves especially those in our midst, to retrieve our very inheritance. Else if we keep dancing to the lofty tunes they're playing into our wanting ears, hmm; I fear ruggedness of the modern-colonizer when he strikes.
Long live the youths of Africa!


Monday, August 4, 2014

African Development: The long path!

It's becoming very glaring the extent to which internal conflict and insurgency would barrier the growth of the African continent. In recent years, we have witnessed sharp emergence of #Islamist groups around countries in Africa including #Nigeria, #Kenya, #Sudan, Congo DR. This has occurred in a time when Africans are talking possible ways out of internal conflict which had taken critical toll around the continent, to mold foundational pillars to development

The very fact that these insurgent is perpetrated by Africans themselves raises queries that bugs the mind. Why should it be Africans rising against her very citizens? What political interest would push people to consider insurgency as an alternative to topple powers? 
I thought African people would have keyed into using issue-based and citizen-oriented strategies/advocacy to bring out the needed change. Let is not be that we have been willed into becoming our own enemies.

Fellow African youths, I am seriously bothered by what the future of this great continent would become in the face of dire insecurity and internally generated conflicts, considering the fact that many young Africans have taken initiatives to foster social change and development but can any development strive alongside insurgency?

This is just be one stanza of the whole hymn!

Monday, June 30, 2014

The Future of Energy


It is pertinent to note that the place of energy in the global system cannot be over-emphasized. Presently, the source of globally energy dependence has contributed massive to environmental degradation and other negative effects including climate change, depletion of ozone layer, oil spillage, and acid rain.

We cannot however continue to depend fully on energy sources that do not support the ecosystem. Therefore, the need to develop alternative energy sources which supports the environment with sustainable options. Already we have sources like solar and wind-mill which if utilized would significantly reduce the level of environmental impact we currently face.

Currently, one major challenge with renewable energy is building its supply capacity to support heavy industrial and manufacturing sectors; that is for developed countries. Developing countries still has a very farther miles to trek.

In overcoming the foreseeing challenges that accompany the utilization of renewable energy, we would require technological research to foster innovations where renewable energy could be able to power heavy industries. Furthermore, there is urgent need for political leaders, corporate organizations and CEOs especially from OPEC countries to think diversification and reinvestment of oil income in renewable energy. This is a solution that requires committed rework.

Monday, June 3, 2013

Children...They Count


On Children and sustainable development, I just want to be specific about some challenges surrounding this issue in Nigeria. This is important because Nigeria happens to be a member state to the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Currently, Nigeria's demography is bent on its youthful generation, which amounts up to 80 percent of the over 160 million people in the country.

Children specifically are facing a lot challenges ranging from orphanage, violation and deprivation of their rights to parental care/support, education, enabling environment for growth etc. Various insurgences in both Southern and Northern Nigeria has squarely affected the well-being of children. In the whole, this is proven when you drive along the roads of major cities and towns in Nigeria. What you see are children begging road users for help -whether financially or otherwise, to assist them survive. This to me, raises so many questions unanswered questions.

Government with the support of individuals, corporate organization and NGOs have to urgently work out sustainable modalities and strategies to take children off the street, by directly taking charge of those street kids and also going further to inquire about situations that led to their becoming beggars. 

Paying deaf ears to these issues would continuously create chaos and instability in the society. These children are growing and becoming more vulnerable to drug use and abuse, child pregnancy, unsafe abortion, rape, thuggery, armed robbery and all forms of societal violation and illegalities. What future do we expect if these gaps keep widening?

"Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear." -Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa
"Children are our most valuable resource." -Herbert Hoover, 31st U.S. president

"I continue to believe that if children are given the necessary tools to succeed, they will succeed beyond their wildest dreams!" -David Vitter, U.S. senator
"It's the greatest poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish." -Mother Teresa, Roman Catholic nun
 
 




Thursday, January 24, 2013

Now that I've Grown


The hoods have their different lessons to learn from–childhood, teenage, puberty, maturity and adulthood. I 've had it all –the goodest, baddest, and the ugliest but yet to get the best. At a particular stage, I used to read books, view movies and listen to stories maybe to just grab it; but now I found out that the whole ideology, concept and perspective towards all that has completely changed. Whether it’s a book, movie or story (gist); I would try as much as possible to learn one thing at least from it.

Someone who averagely knows me would accept the fact that I do argue whenever the need arises. Mom would say “I knew that you will argue”. For me, that is just a clear sign of mind-maturity. As a teenager, one has to only accept everything; go on with every quotable quotes. It is different now. I would not accept all quotes and I would just not go with your opinion. This is because I believe that in every issue bothering on whether the society, groups or an individual, people should have their personal opinion about it. Sincerely I would come into your discussion if and only if I have an idea about such issue.  But it’s hard in a society where people wants theirs and only theirs opinion to be final.  They do not subscribe to others who may express a bit of discomfort. Are we not democratic? Look! I’m not one of those guys whom you can just bring up a cooked methodology to the table and think I’d just give a clap to it. For Heaven sake, time and situation changes; so does people and philosophy. Though I’m very optimistic; I do not rule out the possibility of risk. People do say “opportunity comes but once” but me I say “no”. Opportunity come ample times but disguised.
 
What about hope? Don’t confuse me about it. Hope is just as faith. Just as “faith without work is dead”, hope without plan is unrealistic. You can spend days, weeks, months and years to think (“hope”); script it above your bed to see your vision every morning as you awake. If there’s no practical step aiming at it; sorry its just but a mirage. I never said it is wrong to be hopeful, all I’m saying is “don’t let the “hope” thing get you lazy and you just believe that manna would just fall from above. Hope requires a pragmatic plan of action.

Believe me I now realize why I loved Obama’s campaign unconsciously against all odds. Hey, I have read “The Audacity of Hope” and another of his work. They are both inspiring but that isn’t it. After all, there are many other good authors. Only that the theme of his campaign wasn’t something like “We Hope we can” or “There’s hope for America”. “Yes! We can” is practical. Every individual could also say “Yes! I can”. It is such a push that moves the inner-man.

What a sentimental society filled with eye-services? Workplace, religious groups, families, politics even among buddies and so on; everyone is just acting on sentiments. Please, I and others like me are not just comfortable.

Hope I did not terrorize your mind. If I did, make your view public too.

Now or Never

Nigeria has in recent time experienced series of development, but despite these and numerous youth programmes, many youths still suffer significant disadvantages. Estimates shows that in Africa, about 130 million youths are illiterates; youth unemployment is three times higher than that among adults; 102 million youths in Sub-Saharan Africa lives on $1 a day; millions of youths find themselves without education and training, and are easily drawn into conflict and violence.



Globalization is significantly impacting the way development investments are made; and now allow countries to focus on what works based on experience so as to enable appropriate diversification and utilization of resources for sustainable development.

To create a prosperous, balanced and sustainable economy in Nigeria is dependent on good leadership and governance structures. A credible government that understands the society’s needs –security, social services, employment creation, accountability and ensuring right-based society.

Nigeria and the African continent needs a turning point. A growth enabler for her economy, leadership and political life, to meet up enormous challenges and targeted goals before us –the MDGs by 2015, vision 202020.

It is now pertinent that Nigeria’s development will greatly depend on her ability to mobilize the creativity, vision and unique perspectives of youths for the present and future development of the nation. This will be achievable through coordinated and progressive series of activities that helps them become socially, morally and cognitively competent as leaders.

It has to be now or never!

Monday, October 10, 2011

Food: Can we live without it? -what food means to your culture-




Food is anything eaten to satisfy appetite and to meet physiological needs for growth, to maintain all body processes, and to supply energy to maintain body temperature and activity (Microsoft ® Encarta ® 2009). It plays important roles in the livelihood of every living thing most especially human beings. But of the nearly 7 billion people on Earth, an estimated 850 million are undernourished or chronically hungry. With global food production hurting and prices rising, this number is swiftly climbing.

In recent years, countries plunged by natural disaster, wars and famine have continuously suffered severe hunger as a result of food scarcity.


In developing regions, there is currently a contention between switching to match up with modernization. As a way of creating development, government takes over massive hectares of land for housing  or other projects but  at the detriment of farmland and biodiversity reserves.

Climate change is another major cause of food scarcity. In many African regions, farmers now have low yields as farmlands become dryer due shortage of rain. In swampy areas, there is rise in sea level causing heavy overflow of to farmlands and crop destruction.

In south-south Nigeria, a key challenge faced by farmers has to do with the issue of oil spillage in the  Niger-Delta region of the country.

In July, 2011, a famine was officially declared in the Horn of Africa, the first in 30 years. A reported 12,400,000 people don’t have enough food. Between May and July in that region, 29,000 children younger than 5 died of starvation.

Recommendations 


The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provides a long-term and sustainable measure to curbing incessant food scarcity across the globe.

Goal 1 (Eradication of Extreme poverty) focuses on two things: whether people have enough money to meet their basic needs, and whether they have enough food to meet their daily energy requirements. It aims to lift people out of poverty by providing them with the basic things they need to live a decent life: nutritious food to keep them healthy, clothes, clean water, a home, health care, and affordable schooling.

We can help reach this goal by: promoting human rights, increasing the agricultural productivity of small farmers, reforming land rights so that people own their own land, diversifying the economy, encouraging more small and medium size businesses, and increasing construction of roads, ports, power grids and communications to reduce the cost of doing business.

Besides, goal one, working to achieve other goals of the MDGs is pertinent as they are inter-linked. That is, in order to achieve one goal, another has to also be achieved. Therefore, there is urgent need for political will to be able to achieve this feat.

The question is: ‘what if farmlands are gone and preserves finishes, will anyone be saved?’